New Jersey

Navigating Paid Leave in New Jersey

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Start here if you're giving birth!

You’ll need to file for:

  • Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI)
  • Short-term disability insurance (STD), if you have an employer policy (ask HR or refer to your employee handbook)
  • Family Leave Insurance (FLI)

What to Expect

Your employer may cover the difference between what FLI pays to the limits of the paid parental leave policy.

If you have a private STD policy and you’re giving birth, that policy may provide some income above what FLI pays. You’ll need to apply for that too if you’re giving birth.

Your company will pay the difference between what TDI and FLI pay to the limits of the paid parental leave policy. See an example below of what to expect from an employer that offers 14 weeks of paid parental leave:

Numbers, figures, and projections are estimates only and may not be applicable to you.
Consult with your employer or your state's labor office for more information.

Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI)

Who should apply?

APPLY HERE

Birth moms need to apply for Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) first and then Family Leave Insurance (FLI). 

If you received Temporary Disability Insurance benefits from the state while you recovered from delivery, you will receive a form in the mail (FL2) with instructions on how to apply online for Family Leave Insurance benefits to bond with your newborn.

If you haven’t received Temporary Disability Insurance benefits from the state, you can apply for Family Leave Insurance online or with a paper application (FL-1).

Benefits are paid starting on the eighth day of disability. The first seven days of payment (known as the waiting week) is held until you meet one condition: your leave continues for a total of 22 days or more. If your disability continues that long, you will be paid retroactively for the first 7 days.

TDI covers the entire time (up to 26 weeks) that your healthcare provider says you cannot work; which is a minimum of 6 weeks for a natural birth or 8 weeks for a C-section.

What % of pay does it provide? Claimants are paid 85% of their average weekly wage, up to the maximum weekly benefit rate set for that calendar year, which is currently $993 per week.

What’s the most it pays? Currently $993 per week.

Your company will pay the difference between what STD and FLI pay to the limits of the paid parental leave policy. See an example below of what to expect from an employer that offers 14 weeks of paid parental leave:

Start here if you are the dad, spouse, adoptive or foster parent!

If you are not the birthing mom, you have to apply for:

  • Paid Family Leave (PFL)

Family Leave Insurance (FLI)

Who should apply?

APPLY HERE

Your company will cover the difference between what FLI pays to the limits of the paid parental leave policy.

What % of pay does it provide? Claimants are paid 85% of their average weekly wage, up to the maximum weekly benefit rate set for that calendar year, which is currently $993 per week.

What’s the most it pays? Currently $993 per week.

How long will it last? Up to 12 weeks

Your company will pay the difference between what STD and PFL pay to the limits of the paid parental leave policy. See an example below of what to expect from an employer that offers 14 weeks of paid parental leave: